Wildlife Sightings

Lifescapes

July 20th, 2009 by Narendran M. M.

Ecological Haven

Very often, we do not notice the wealth of tiny creatures that live around us. Today, I’d like to share with you a few glimpses of these vital beings in and around Orange County Kabini.

Golden Backed Ant (Camponotus sericeus)

Golden Backed Ant (Camponotus sericeus)



Common Godzilla Ant (Camponotus compressus)

Common Godzilla Ant (Camponotus compressus)



Greater Striated Bispinous Ant (Diacamma ceylonese)

Greater Striated Bispinous Ant (Diacamma ceylonese)



Ants contribute nearly 25% of the animal weight in the tropics, but very little is known about them. Many of them feed on sugary substances; quite a few choose to hunt other creatures and hence serve as an essential link in the food chain.

Beetle (Phyllobius calcaratus)

Beetle (Phyllobius calcaratus)



Dragon fly

Dragon fly



Dragon flies are considered indicators of fresh water. They lay their eggs only in fresh water and feed on mosquitoes. The adult fly feeds on adult mosquitoes while the dragon fly larvae feed on mosquito larvae, thereby controlling the population of mosquitoes.

Dragon fly emerged from Nymph state

Dragon fly emerged from Nymph state



This little Dragon fly didn’t make it into the world. His transformation from the Nymph state into adulthood failed, as it died due to excess heat.

Honey Bee (Apis mellifera)

Honey Bee (Apis mellifera)



Nestled among the flowers of a tamarind tree, this Honey Bee seemed to have had an unusual sour tooth!!

Mottled Emigrant Butterfly (Catopsilia pyranthe)

Mottled Emigrant Butterfly (Catopsilia pyranthe)

This stunning butterfly helps in pollination. Its colour almost merges with the leaves, one needs a keen eye to notice it.

Common Garden Lizard/Blood Sucker (Calotes versicolor)

Common Garden Lizard/Blood Sucker (Calotes versicolor)



The commencement of the breeding season is during April to September. The males, in their pursuit of females become conspicuous in excitement which results in brilliant coloration. The shoulder, parts of forelegs, and the head especially, turn brilliant scarlet or crimson with black patches on sides of the throat and hence the name Blood sucker. They feed mainly on insects.

Bicoloured Frog (Rana curtipes)

Bicoloured Frog (Rana curtipes)



Amphibians are considered to be the best indicators of environmental health. A decline in their population indicates a deterioration in the ecosystem that might affect a wider spectrum of the earth’s biological diversity. These creatures are the first to be affected by habitat loss, global warming and toxic chemicals. Thankfully, the sighting of this Bicoloured Frog endorses the opulence of the environment in Kabini.

Today, I feel blessed living amidst such a healthy ecosystem. All thanks to Mother Nature and her beloved River Kabini.



This entry was posted on Monday, July 20th, 2009 at 5:44 pm and is filed under Amphibians in Kabini, Insects, Reptiles. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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